Japanese Yen Stocks List

Related ETFs - A few ETFs which own one or more of the above listed Japanese Yen stocks.

Recent Signals

Date Stock Signal Type
2021-04-16 DBJP Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 DBJP 20 DMA Support Bullish
2021-04-16 DBJP Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 DBV 20 DMA Resistance Bearish
2021-04-16 DXJ Doji - Bearish? Reversal
2021-04-16 DXJ Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 DXJ Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 DXJS Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 DXJS Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 FXY Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 HEWJ Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 HEWJ 180 Bullish Setup Bullish Swing Setup
2021-04-16 HEWJ Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 HEWJ Crossed Above 20 DMA Bullish
2021-04-16 HJPX Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 HJPX Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 JPXN Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 JPXN Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 PICB Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2021-04-16 PICB Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2021-04-16 PICB Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 PICB 50 DMA Support Bullish
2021-04-16 PICB MACD Bullish Centerline Cross Bullish
2021-04-16 UDN Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 UDN Doji - Bearish? Reversal
2021-04-16 UDN Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2021-04-16 UDN NR7 Range Contraction
2021-04-16 UUP MACD Bearish Centerline Cross Bearish
2021-04-16 UUP Stochastic Buy Signal Bullish
2021-04-16 UUP Doji - Bullish? Reversal
2021-04-16 UUP Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2021-04-16 UUP Fell Below 50 DMA Bearish
2021-04-16 YCS Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction

Recent News for Japanese Yen Stocks

Date Stock Title
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The yen (Japanese: 円, Hepburn: en, symbol: ¥; code: JPY; also abbreviated as JP¥) is the official currency of Japan. It is the third most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar and the euro. It is also widely used as a reserve currency after the U.S. dollar, the euro, and the pound sterling.
The concept of the yen was a component of the Meiji government's modernization program of Japan's economy; which postulated the pursuit of a uniform currency throughout the country modeled after the European decimal currency system.
Before the Meiji Restoration, Japan's feudal fiefs all issued their own money, hansatsu, in an array of incompatible denominations. The New Currency Act of 1871 did away with these and established the yen, which was defined as 1.5 g (0.048 troy ounces) of gold, or 24.26 g (0.780 troy ounces) of silver, as the new decimal currency. The former han (fiefs) became prefectures and their mints private chartered banks, which initially retained the right to print money. To bring an end to this situation the Bank of Japan was founded in 1882 and given a monopoly on controlling the money supply.Following World War II the yen lost much of its prewar value. To stabilize the Japanese economy the exchange rate of the yen was fixed at ¥360 per $1 as part of the Bretton Woods system. When that system was abandoned in 1971, the yen became undervalued and was allowed to float. The yen had appreciated to a peak of ¥271 per $1 in 1973, then underwent periods of depreciation and appreciation due to the 1973 oil crisis, arriving at a value of ¥227 per $1 by 1980.
Since 1973, the Japanese government has maintained a policy of currency intervention, and the yen is therefore under a "dirty float" regime. This intervention continues to this day. The Japanese government focuses on a competitive export market, and tries to ensure a low yen value through a trade surplus. The Plaza Accord of 1985 temporarily changed this situation from its average of ¥239 per US$1 in 1985 to ¥128 in 1988 and led to a peak value of ¥80 against the U.S. dollar in 1995, effectively increasing the value of Japan’s GDP to almost that of the United States. Since that time, however, the yen has greatly decreased in value. The Bank of Japan maintains a policy of zero to near-zero interest rates and the Japanese government has previously had an extreme anti-inflation policy.

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