Hypertension Stocks List

Recent Signals

Date Stock Signal Type
2020-08-10 ABT NR7 Range Contraction
2020-08-10 ALKS Fell Below 50 DMA Bearish
2020-08-10 ALKS 200 DMA Support Bullish
2020-08-10 ALKS Hammer Candlestick Bullish
2020-08-10 AZN Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2020-08-10 AZN Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 AZN Stochastic Buy Signal Bullish
2020-08-10 BLPH Lower Bollinger Band Walk Weakness
2020-08-10 BLPH Slingshot Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 BMY Upper Bollinger Band Walk Strength
2020-08-10 DXR Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2020-08-10 LCI Shooting Star Candlestick Bearish
2020-08-10 LCI Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 LVGO 20 DMA Support Bullish
2020-08-10 LVGO 1,2,3 Pullback Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 LVGO Calm After Storm Range Contraction
2020-08-10 LVGO Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 LVGO Hammer Candlestick Bullish
2020-08-10 OTRK Upper Bollinger Band Walk Strength
2020-08-10 OTRK Calm After Storm Range Contraction
2020-08-10 OTRK Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 OTRK New 52 Week Closing High Bullish
2020-08-10 RDHL New Uptrend Bullish
2020-08-10 RDHL New 52 Week Closing High Bullish
2020-08-10 RDHL Upper Bollinger Band Walk Strength
2020-08-10 RDHL Stochastic Reached Overbought Strength
2020-08-10 RDHL Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 RDHL Volume Surge Other
2020-08-10 RDHL New 52 Week High Strength
2020-08-10 SNY 180 Bearish Setup Bearish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 SNY Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2020-08-10 XOMA Slingshot Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2020-08-10 XOMA MACD Bullish Signal Line Cross Bullish

Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated. High blood pressure typically does not cause symptoms. Long-term high blood pressure, however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, and dementia.High blood pressure is classified as either primary (essential) high blood pressure or secondary high blood pressure. About 90–95% of cases are primary, defined as high blood pressure due to nonspecific lifestyle and genetic factors. Lifestyle factors that increase the risk include excess salt in the diet, excess body weight, smoking, and alcohol use. The remaining 5–10% of cases are categorized as secondary high blood pressure, defined as high blood pressure due to an identifiable cause, such as chronic kidney disease, narrowing of the kidney arteries, an endocrine disorder, or the use of birth control pills.Blood pressure is expressed by two measurements, the systolic and diastolic pressures, which are the maximum and minimum pressures, respectively. For most adults, normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100–130 millimeters mercury (mmHg) systolic and 60–80 mmHg diastolic. For most adults, high blood pressure is present if the resting blood pressure is persistently at or above 130/80 or 140/90 mmHg. Different numbers apply to children. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a 24-hour period appears more accurate than office-based blood pressure measurement.Lifestyle changes and medications can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications. Lifestyle changes include weight loss, physical exercise, decreased salt intake, reducing alcohol intake, and a healthy diet. If lifestyle changes are not sufficient then blood pressure medications are used. Up to three medications can control blood pressure in 90% of people. The treatment of moderately high arterial blood pressure (defined as >160/100 mmHg) with medications is associated with an improved life expectancy. The effect of treatment of blood pressure between 130/80 mmHg and 160/100 mmHg is less clear, with some reviews finding benefit and others finding unclear benefit. High blood pressure affects between 16 and 37% of the population globally. In 2010 hypertension was believed to have been a factor in 18% of all deaths (9.4 million globally).

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