Trust Law Stocks List

Recent Signals

Date Stock Signal Type
2019-11-15 APAM Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 BPOPM Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 BPOPM Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 BPOPM NR7-2 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 BPOPM NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 BPOPN Bullish Engulfing Bullish
2019-11-15 BRT Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 BRT 20 DMA Support Bullish
2019-11-15 BTT Lower Bollinger Band Walk Weakness
2019-11-15 BTT Stochastic Buy Signal Bullish
2019-11-15 BTT NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 BUI NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 BUI Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 CMCT New 52 Week Closing Low Bearish
2019-11-15 CMCT Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
2019-11-15 CMCT 20 DMA Resistance Bearish
2019-11-15 CMCTP Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 CMCTP Volume Surge Other
2019-11-15 CMU 50 DMA Support Bullish
2019-11-15 CMU 200 DMA Support Bullish
2019-11-15 CMU Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 CMU 20 DMA Support Bullish
2019-11-15 CPT Crossed Above 50 DMA Bullish
2019-11-15 CRT Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 CRT Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 DXB Three Weeks Tight Range Contraction
2019-11-15 DXB 20 DMA Support Bullish
2019-11-15 ESS Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 ESS New Downtrend Bearish
2019-11-15 ETX Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish
2019-11-15 ETX Fell Below 50 DMA Bearish
2019-11-15 ETX MACD Bearish Centerline Cross Bearish
2019-11-15 GLD NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 GLD Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 GLD Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 OSBCP Pocket Pivot Bullish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 OSBCP Crossed Above 20 DMA Bullish
2019-11-15 OSBCP Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 OSBCP Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 PHYS NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 PHYS Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 PHYS Spinning Top Other
2019-11-15 PHYS Calm After Storm Range Contraction
2019-11-15 PLTM Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 PSLV NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 PSLV Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 PSLV Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 PVL Lower Bollinger Band Walk Weakness
2019-11-15 SLV Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
2019-11-15 SLV Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
2019-11-15 SLV NR7 Range Contraction
2019-11-15 XFLT MACD Bearish Centerline Cross Bearish
2019-11-15 XFLT MACD Bearish Signal Line Cross Bearish
2019-11-15 XFLT Wide Range Bar Range Expansion
2019-11-15 XFLT Volume Surge Other
2019-11-15 XFLT Fell Below 20 DMA Bearish

A trust is a three-party fiduciary relationship in which the first party, the trustor or settlor, transfers ("settles") a property (often but not necessarily a sum of money) upon the second party (the trustee) for the benefit of the third party, the beneficiary.A testamentary trust is created by a will and arises after the death of the settlor. An inter vivos trust is created during the settlor's lifetime by a trust instrument. A trust may be revocable or irrevocable; in the United States, a trust is presumed to be irrevocable unless the instrument or will creating it states it is revocable, except in California, Oklahoma and Texas, in which trusts are presumed to be revocable until the instrument or will creating them states they are irrevocable. An irrevocable trust can be "broken" (revoked) only by a judicial proceeding.
Trusts and similar relationships have existed since Roman times.The trustee is the legal owner of the property in trust, as fiduciary for the beneficiary or beneficiaries who is/are the equitable owner(s) of the trust property. Trustees thus have a fiduciary duty to manage the trust to the benefit of the equitable owners. They must provide a regular accounting of trust income and expenditures. Trustees may be compensated and be reimbursed their expenses. A court of competent jurisdiction can remove a trustee who breaches his/her fiduciary duty. Some breaches of fiduciary duty can be charged and tried as criminal offences in a court of law.
A trustee can be a natural person, a business entity or a public body. A trust in the United States may be subject to federal and state taxation.
A trust is created by a settlor, who transfers title to some or all of his or her property to a trustee, who then holds title to that property in trust for the benefit of the beneficiaries. The trust is governed by the terms under which it was created. In most jurisdictions, this requires a contractual trust agreement or deed. It is possible for a single individual to assume the role of more than one of these parties, and for multiple individuals to share a single role. For example, in a living trust it is common for the grantor to be both a trustee and a lifetime beneficiary while naming other contingent beneficiaries.Trusts have existed since Roman times and have become one of the most important innovations in property law. Trust law has evolved through court rulings differently in different states, so statements in this article are generalizations; understanding the jurisdiction-specific case law involved is tricky. Some U.S. states are adapting the Uniform Trust Code to codify and harmonize their trust laws, but state-specific variations still remain.
An owner placing property into trust turns over part of his or her bundle of rights to the trustee, separating the property's legal ownership and control from its equitable ownership and benefits. This may be done for tax reasons or to control the property and its benefits if the settlor is absent, incapacitated, or deceased. Testamentary trusts may be created in wills, defining how money and property will be handled for children or other beneficiaries.
While the trustee is given legal title to the trust property, in accepting the property title, the trustee owes a number of fiduciary duties to the beneficiaries. The primary duties owed include the duty of loyalty, the duty of prudence, the duty of impartiality. A trustee may be held to a very high standard of care in their dealings, in order to enforce their behavior. To ensure beneficiaries receive their due, trustees are subject to a number of ancillary duties in support of the primary duties, including a duties of openness and transparency; duties of recordkeeping, accounting, and disclosure. In addition, a trustee has a duty to know, understand, and abide by the terms of the trust and relevant law. The trustee may be compensated and have expenses reimbursed, but otherwise must turn over all profits from the trust properties.
There are strong restrictions regarding a trustee with conflict of interests. Courts can reverse a trustee's actions, order profits returned, and impose other sanctions if they finds a trustee has failed in any of their duties. Such a failure is termed a breach of trust and can leave a neglectful or dishonest trustee with severe liabilities for their failures. It is highly advisable for both settlors and trustees to seek qualified legal counsel prior to entering into a trust agreement.

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